M. Glick Farm2018-09-05T00:17:51+00:00

Project Description

M. Glick Farm

Every now and then I visit an egg farm where the farmer is so full of enthusiasm about his job, that our visit gives him just the excuse needed to show us his hens, his yard or pasture, and his barn. This was the case when we pulled into the lane at the Glick farm.

We passed the usual buggies parked in his “garage,” enjoyed the colorful clothes waving in the breeze, admired his flowers, and chuckled at his push mower. And by “push mower” I don’t mean your walk behind self-propelled model. I mean a silent cut reel mower like the rest of us remember from our grandpa’s house or from the pages of a Lehman’s catalog. All of this set the atmosphere for our visit, but the focal point was the farmer. He didn’t seem out of the ordinary until he showed us his cage free set up and began talking. His barn was clean and spacious with a light natural breeze coming in on all sides from floor to ceiling. The hens were happy – active and yet calm.

At this family owned and run farm, M. Is not the only one who enjoys his work. In fact his own mother helps regularly. “She still loves being with the hens.” Unlike most of our farms, these hens are not brown. A second generation farmer, M. explained that he prefers the personality of his white hens. “I’m always open to learning more, but I find the whites are best all around and are just my favorites.” He answered our many questions very knowledgeably, and yet managed to fire out many questions himself. He was interested in the benefits of other specialty eggs such as pasture raised, organic, and omega 3. He expressed a desire to learn more and also told us how much he appreciated being a part of Nature’s Yoke.

About the Author:

Helen Leibee
Mother of eleven children (six natural and five adopted) and grandmother of thirteen, I have spent decades preparing food, raising chickens and other farm animals alongside our menagerie, researching health and nutrition topics, watching food trends, and incorporating varied cultural traditions into our homeschool, small farm lifestyle. Gardening and finding farm fresh were always prioritized and still are.